A Carder’s First Experience

A Carder’s First Experience

A Carder’s First Experience

We do not support carding! This is for educational purposes only – and reflect the author’s own experience and views only.

Here’s how card technology works: There are two to three tracks on the magnetic strip of a
credit or debit card. Track 3 is sometimes not even present on cards, and most major
networks only use tracks 1 and 2.
This is the format for Track 1: account number^Lastname/Firstname^expiration
date(YY/MM)::bank key(3 numbers)::discretionary data or security key(in this case it was a
CVC code – 3 numbers)::Longitudinal Redundancy Check.

This is the format for Track 2:
account number=expiration date(YY/MM)::service code(3 numbers)::discretionary data or
security key (3 numbers)::Longitudinal Redundancy Check
A lot of the information from Track 1 is repeated on Track 2.
Now we can make my example meaningful:
Lets divide Track 1:
4631588xxxxx//<lastname>,<firstname>.//1601//101//163//03100495000000
1 Our primary account number is: 4631588xxxxx
2 Our account holder is: <lastname><firstname>
3 Our Expiration date is: 01/16
4 Our service code is: 101
5 Our CVC code is: 163
Once I had organized this information, it became a matter of cashing out the card.
The difficulty of actually using this information is figuring out how to use it anonymously. I
decided that once again, I would turn to Bitcoin. There are several things a website asks
you for when you use a debit or credit card: the primary account number, the expiration
date, and the security (CVC) code.
Since all of this was included in the dump, I could use the card online without any problems.
I decided to purchase gift cards, which I would then sell for Bitcoins. After doing my Bitcoin
> Litecoin > Bitcoin tumbling scheme mentioned earlier, I could deposit these into my wallet.
However, I never got that far. My plan would have been successful…had the card holder’s
account not been closed.

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